CHI 2022

Self-Determination Theory in HCI: Shaping a Research Agenda

CHI 2022 Workshop



Self-determination theory (SDT)—a multifaceted theory stating that people are motivated by innate and universal psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness—has become one of the most frequently used and well-validated theories used in HCI research, but its use often remains superficial and disjointed. This workshop therefore convenes researchers across application domains (games, health and wellbeing, learning, etc.) to co-create a research agenda on how SDT-informed HCI research can maximise its progress in the coming years.

Interested participants should submit a short position piece (up to 1500 words, excluding references, in the ACM single column format) outlining one challenge or opportunity they’ve identified around SDT in HCI. We invite submissions on questions including but not limited to:
  • Forming theories: Articulating ‘mid-range’ and domain-specific theories and models of SDT for HCI issues.
  • Testing predictions: Identifying key untested predictions of SDT in HCI areas.
  • Advancing methods: Issues and advances for robust HCI study designs and measurements on SDT constructs.
  • Widening application areas: Identifying new HCI areas of application for SDT.
  • Exploring mini-theories: Unpacking possible HCI applications of under-used SDT mini-theories.
  • Computational interaction: Computational methods for measuring, modelling, predicting SDT constructs and adapting interfaces.
  • Translational research: Methods, patterns, and other translational resources making SDT applicable in interaction design.
Accepted papers will be invited to be submitted in extended form to a special issue with Interacting with Computers, which will also publish the resultant joint research agenda.

Keynotes

    Richard Ryan - "The next 10 years of SDT research"
    Marc Hassenzahl
- "Contextualising SDT in wider user experience and wellbeing-driven design'
    Yvonne Rogers
- "The role and value of theory-related work in HCI"

How to Participate

  • Submissions are closed.
  • Attendees will join either a remote 4-hour session during the CHI 2022 web exclusive (April 13, 2022) or a fully in-person full-day session at CHI 2022 in New Orleans (May 1)
 Please note: at least one author of each accepted position paper must attend one of the workshop sessions, and that all participants must register for both the workshop and for at least one day of the CHI 2022 conference.

Chairs

  • Nick Ballou, Queen Mary University 
  • Rafael Calvo, Imperial College London
  • Sebastian Deterding, University of York
  • Elisa Mekler, Aalto University 
  • Dorian Peters, University of Cambridge 
  • Selen Turkay, Queensland University of Technology
  • April Tyack, Aalto University
  • Gabriela Villalobos-Zúñiga, University of Lausanne

Download Workshop Description Paper [PDF]

Organisation of the Virtual and Onsite Workshop

To make our workshop accessible, we will run it both as a virtual and a face-to-face session. The basic flow is the same for both, following a ‘wisdom of the crowd’ approach where sessions work more or less independently, and results are then integrated after the workshop and shared with all participants. The virtual sessions are kept shorter by offloading external keynotes into pre-recorded video that participants can watch in advance. We hope this shorter format retains sufficient time for socialising and productive work while making it easier to fit into schedules and avoiding Zoom fatigue. We will also set up a social platform (Discord) so participants of both virtual and onsite sessions can communicate with each other before, during, and after the workshop.

Virtual session(s)
During the online period (April 14/15, 2022), we will run up to six separate 4-hour virtual sessions staggered in different time zones: North America, Europe, and Asia-Pacific, depending on number and location of participants who sign up for the virtual session.

On-site session
On May 1, we will run an 8-hour (5.75 working hours) in-person session in New Orleans.

Session structure
 

Both sessions follow the same steps:

  • Introduction: Organisers welcome and walk through the workshop.
  • Lightning round: Each participant gives a 2-minute presentation introducing themselves and summarising their position piece.
  • World café: Participants rotate among tables/Miro boards (each corresponds to a theme), identifying and categorising issues related to that theme.
  • Fleshing out: Small groups work out a chosen theme into a templated, clear overview and potential next steps.
  • Wrap up: Groups present their fleshed out themes, and organisers collect feedback and guide next steps.
These steps are interspersed with breaks. The onsite workshop will include the pre-recorded keynotes and a live Q&A with Richard Ryan. Virtual session participants can pose questions for the Q&A and will access a recording of it afterward.

Workshop Outputs

The results from virtual and on-site sessions will be integrated into a draft research agenda after the workshop that all accepted attendees are then invited to review and refine as co-authors. Accepted papers will remain available on the workshop site prior to the event and are invited to be submitted in extended form to a special issue with Interacting with Computers, which will also publish the resulting joint research agenda.

Accepted Position Papers

Emil Rosenlund Høeg, Aalborg University, Denmark
Jolene Van Der Kaap-Deeder, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway

John M. Carroll, The Pennsylvania State University, USA

Claudette Pretorius, School of Computer Science, University College Dublin, Ireland
David Coyle, School of Computer Science, University College Dublin, Ireland

Nick Ballou, Queen Mary University of London, UK

Kathleen Ryan, S3 Connected Health; University College Cork, Ireland 
Eva Cooney, S3 Connected Health; National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland

6. Self-determination theory and competition in digital games-for-health: Need satisfaction, need frustration, and intrinsic motivation
Arlen C. Moller, Department of Psychology, Illinois Institute of Technology, USA
Rachel Kornfield. Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University, USA 
Amy S. Lu, College of Arts, Media and Design, Bouvé College of Health Sciences, Northeastern University, USA

Amy S. Lu, Health Technology Lab, College of Arts, Media and Design, Bouvé College of Health Sciences, Northeastern University, USA
Arlen C. Moller, Department of Psychology, Illinois Institute of Technology, USA

Brunella Botte, Department of Health and Life Sciences, Link Campus University; 
Utrecht Center for Game Research, Utrecht University, The Netherlands
Henk Aarts, Department of Psychology, Utrecht University, The Netherlands
Sander Bakkes, Utrecht Center for Game Research, Utrecht University, The Netherlands
Remco Veltkamp, Utrecht Center for Game Research, Utrecht University, The Netherlands

James R. Wallace, University of Waterloo, Canada

Merlin Knaeble, Mario Nadj, and Alexander Maedche,
Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany

Rebecca Eilert, University of Siegen, Germany
Marc Hassenzahl, University of Siegen, Germany

Felix Dietrich, Department of Communication, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Germany
Leonard Reinecke, Department of Communication, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Germany

Mehmet Kosa, Arizona State University, Department of Psychology, USA

Nadine Wagner, University of Bremen, Germany
Jasmin Niess, University of St. Gallen, Switzerland
Yvonne Rogers, UCL Interaction Centre, UK

Tom Cole, Goldsmiths, University of London, UK

Danića Mast, Research Group Healthy Lifestyle in a Supporting Environment, The Hague University of Applied Science; Leiden Institute of Advanced Computer Science, Leiden University, the Netherlands
Sanne I. de Vries, Research Group Healthy Lifestyle in a Supporting Environment, The Hague University of Applied Science, the Netherlands 

Ian S. Sturrock, Teesside University, UK

Kai Lukoff, Dub, University of Washington, USA
Ulrik Lyngs, Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford, UK
Lize Alberts, Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford, UK

Katelyn M. Grasse, University of California, Santa Cruz
Max Kreminski, University of California, Santa Cruz
Noah Wardrip-Fruin, University of California, Santa Cruz
Michael Mateas, University of California, Santa Cruz
Edward F. Merlcer, University of California, Santa Cruz

Bruna Oewel, University of California, Irvine, USA
Elena Agapie, University of California, Irvine, USA
Madhu Reddy, University of California, Irvine, USA

Michael Hoeffer, Department of Computer Science, University of Colorado Boulder, USA
Stephen Voida, Department of Information Science, University of Colorado Boulder, USA


Contact

For any questions, email us at n.b.ballou@qmul.ac.uk